There is a common belief in Japan concerning the numbers one hundred and one thousand. For example, if you make one hundred prayers at a shrine, your prayer will be heard; or if you make one thousand paper cranes, your wish will come true. Obviously, the fulfillment of prayers or wishes do not happen for real often, but we as human beings like to believe in something, especially when those prayers and wishes involve things beyond the control of our individual abilities or wisdom. The process of repeating an action one hundred or one thousand times is believed to help ease our worries, as the time spent completing these tasks can meditate us. This meditative time is real, unchangeable, and universal. 

One Thousand Prayers

ONE THOUSAND PRAYERS, 2009

Silkscreen, Monoprint, and Linoleum cut

60” x 202-1/2”

ONE HUNDRED PROMISES TO THE EARTH, 2010

Woodcut, Silkscreen, Monoprint, and Collagraph

81” x 96”

Installation view – One Thousand Prayers

Olin Art Gallery, 2012

Washington & Jefferson College, Washington, Pennsylvania

ONE THOUSAND PERSON-STITCHES, 2010

Linoleum cut on fabric & Stitches

6” x 69”

ONE THOUSAND PERSON-STITCHES - Detail, 2010

Installation view

Olin Art Gallery, 2012

Washington & Jefferson College, Washington, Pennsylvania

SADAKO’S DIARY #2, 2010

Silkscreen and Monoprint on folded and opened paper

40-1/2” x 40-1/2”

SADAKO’S DIARY #1, 2010

Silkscreen and Monoprint on folded and opened paper

40-1/2” x 40-1/2”

RETURNING HOME #3, 2010

Collagraph and Monoprint on folded and opened paper

26-1/4” x 39-1/2”

RETURNING HOME #1, 2010

Collagraph and Monoprint on folded and opened paper

26-1/4” x 39-1/2”

RETURNING HOME #2, 2010

Collagraph and Monoprint on folded and opened paper

26-1/4” x 39-1/2”